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NASA maps the mission "bright echoes" of a gigantic new black hole



NASA has revealed a stunning view of what happens when a black hole accumulates a nearby star.

NASA has used an international space station device to detect X-ray light from the recently discovered black hole MAXI J1820 + 070 (abbreviation J1820).

They were fortunate enough to study a black hole because they used material from a common star.

The resulting waves of X-rays create "light echoes" that reflect the swirling gas near the black hole and reveal changes in the size and shape of the environment.

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Artistic impression of the event: Wave X-rays created

Artistic impression of the event: Wave X-rays created

Artistic impression of the event: X-ray waves created "light echoes" that reflect the swirling gas near the black hole and reveal changes in the size and shape of the environment.

MAXI BLACK HOLE

The J1820 is about 10,000 light years away from the constellation Leo.

Astronomers did not know about the presence of black holes until March 11, 2018, when an explosion of the Japanese Air Survey Agency for Celtic X-Ray Image Surveillance (MAXI) was seen on board a space station.

The J1820 went from a completely unknown black hole to one of the brightest sources on the X-ray sky within a matter of days.

Scientists have characterized an environment that surrounds the star's black hole weight, which is ten times the mass of the Sun, using the payload of Star Neutron Star (NICER) onboard the International Space Station.

NICER detected X-ray light from a recently discovered black hole called MAXI J1820 + 070 (abbreviation J1820) because it consumed material from a common star.

Scientists give astronomers a new look at the inner work of the black hole.

"NICER allowed us to measure light echoes closer to the black hole than ever before," said Erin Kara, an astrophysicist at the University of Maryland, College Park and Goddard Space Flight Center NASA in Greenbelt, Maryland. findings at the 233rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Seattle.

"Previously, these light echoes from the internal accretion disc were observed only in supermassive black holes, which are millions of billions of solar masses and are slowly undergoing change.

"Stellar black holes like the J1820 have much lower weight and they are developing much faster, so we can see how the changes change into the human time zone."

The document describing the findings, led by Kara, appeared in the January 10 issue of Nature and is available online.

The J1820 is about 10,000 light years away from the constellation Leo.

A common star in the system was identified in a Gaia ESA (European Space Agency) survey that allowed researchers to estimate the distance.

Astronomers did not know about the presence of black holes until March 11, 2018, when an explosion of the Japanese Air Survey Agency for Celtic X-Ray Image Surveillance (MAXI) was seen on board a space station.

The J1820 went from a completely unknown black hole to one of the brightest sources on the X-ray sky within a matter of days.

NICER moved quickly to capture this dramatic transition and continued to watch the fading tail of the eruption.

Astronomers did not know about the presence of black holes until March 11, 2018, when an explosion of the Japanese Air Survey Agency for viewing a full-screen X-ray image (MAXI) was also discovered on board a space station (pictured)

Astronomers did not know about the presence of black holes until March 11, 2018, when an explosion of the Japanese Air Survey Agency for viewing a full-screen X-ray image (MAXI) was also discovered on board a space station (pictured)

Astronomers did not know about the presence of black holes until March 11, 2018, when an explosion of the Japanese Air Survey Agency for viewing a full-screen X-ray image (MAXI) was also discovered on board a space station (pictured)

A black hole can emit gas from a nearby companion star into a circle of material called accretion disk.

Gravitational and magnetic forces heat the disk to millions of degrees, which is so hot that they produce x-rays on the inside of the disk, near the black hole.

Explosions occur when disc instability causes the flow of gas to move inward toward a black hole like an avalanche.

Causes of disk instability are poorly understood.

Above the disk there is a corona, an area of ​​subatomic particles around 1 billion degrees Celsius (1.8 billion degrees Fahrenheit), which shines in high-energy X-rays.

Many mysteries remain about the origin and development of the corona.

A black hole can emit gas from a nearby companion star into a circle of material called accretion disk.

A black hole can emit gas from a nearby companion star into a circle of material called accretion disk.

A black hole can emit gas from a nearby companion star into a circle of material called accretion disk.

Some theories suggest that the structure could be an early form of high-speed particle nozzles that are often issued by these systems.

Astrophysicists want to better understand how the inner surface of the accretion disc and the coronas change over it in size and shape because the black hole attracts material from its common star.

If they can understand how and why these changes appear in star black holes for several weeks, scientists could illustrate how supermassive black holes are developing for millions of years and how they affect the galaxies they live in.

New observations also provide scientists with new insights into how energy is released into the black hole and how energy is released.

"NICER's J1820 observations have taught us something new about star black holes and how we could use them as analogues for studying supermassive black holes and their effects on galaxy formation," said co-author Philip Uttley, an astrophysicist at the University of Amsterdam.

"We have seen four similar events in the first year of NICER and it's remarkable. It seems to us as if we were at the edge of a huge breakthrough in X-ray astronomy."


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