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A silent epidemic that kills more people than HIV, malaria or tuberculosis



Hepatitis virus. Shutterstock Photo

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0e) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = AIDS, the most lethal and dreaded virus more deadly. Hepatitis B (HBV) has become a silent epidemic that today kills more people than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis around the world."Although many believe that HIV that causes AIDS is the most lethal and feared virus, another viral disease is more lethal. Hepatitis B (HBV) has become a silent epidemic that today kills more people than HIV, malaria and tuberculosis around the world.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" typ = "text" content = millions of people World Health Organization (WHO) in a report on this issue of the journal NatureThe most affected are concentrated in the most populated areas of the planet, specifically in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Western Pacific, from China to New Zealand "data-reacttid =" 29 "> This virus causes the death of more than one million people each year as reported by the World Health Organization Organization (WHO) in a report on this issue of the journal Nature, The most affected are concentrated in the most populated areas of the planet, namely Sub-Saharan Africa and the Western Pacific, from China to New Zealand

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0e) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em)This disease, which spreads with blood and body fluids and attacks liver cells, causes liver cancer or cirrhosis., and many carriers do not feel any symptoms they do not even know they have. "data-reactid =" 30 ">This disease, which spreads with blood and body fluids and attacks the liver, causes cancer or cirrhosis in the liver, and many carriers do not feel the symptoms or know they have.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – hepatitis or hepatitis are associated with most deaths. In 2016, the world's death rate for virus hepatitis has risen to 1.4 million, a precondition for deaths from tuberculosis, HIV or malaria, according to the latest WHO World Health report."Hepatitis or inflammation of the liver is caused by several viruses, but types B and C are associated with most deaths. In 2016, the world's death rate for virus hepatitis has risen to 1.4 million, a precondition for deaths from tuberculosis, HIV or malaria, according to the latest WHO World Health report.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0e) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em)According to the WHO, more than 250 million people live with hepatitis B. This number is seven times more than the number of HIV infections, about 36.9 million people in the world. Worldwide, the number of deaths that HBV is causing today is the most lethal and feared virus. "Data-reactid =" 34 ">According to the WHO, more than 250 million people live with hepatitis B. This number is seven times more than the number of HIV infections, about 36.9 million people in the world. So the total number of deaths caused by HBV is now competing with the most deadly and dreaded virus.

This is despite the fact that HBV infection can be prevented by a child's vaccine and treatment is done with the same antiretroviral drugs used to fight HIV.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8m) – sm" type = "text" content = "Philippa Matthews, such as HBV, it considers "HIV is an acute pandemic with many sources, but is totally different from hepatitis B""data-reactid =" 36 "> Philippa Matthews, an immunologist at Oxford University in the UK who studies viral infections such as HBV, believes that "HIV is an acute pandemic with many sources, but is totally different from hepatitis B"

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) this virus "traveled with humanity for tens of thousands of years, and because he was invisible, he never had the injection of political defense, funding, energy and education like HIV.""data-reactid =" 37 "> This researcher assures this this virus "traveled with humanity for tens of thousands of years, and because he was invisible, he never had the injection of political defense, funding, energy and education like HIV."

Also, Ponsiano Ocama, a hepatologist at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, says hepatitis B was largely neglected. Even the health workers themselves, he says, are poorly educated and poorly equipped to deal with them.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0e) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em)Matthews adds that the priority of HIV antiretroviral drugs is so important that some health professionals believe that people with HBV are more likely to receive adequate care if they are infected with HIV, although both infections are likely to lead to premature death."data-reactid =" 39 ">Matthews adds that the priority of HIV antiretroviral drugs is so important that some health professionals believe that people with HBV are more likely to receive adequate care if they are infected with HIV, although both infections are likely to lead to premature death.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0m) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8m) – sm" type = "text" content = change this panorama. The World Health Organization has proposed to eliminate hepatitis as a threat to public health by 2030. By this date, new infections and deaths have to be reduced by 90% by 65%."data-reactiontid =" 40 "> But scientists and clinicians hope to change this picture. The World Health Organization has proposed to eliminate hepatitis as a threat to public health by 2030. By this date, new infections and deaths have to be reduced by 90% by 65%.

To this end, it is a priority to combat the growing HBV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa. Also in the Western Pacific (expanding from China to New Zealand), although vaccination campaigns against this virus were more constant and more effective in the second region.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0e) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em)Approximately 6% of people still live with HBV, but most children and adolescents are protected. However, in Sub-Saharan Africa, where 6% of the population is infected, less than one-tenth of children receive the necessary vaccines. "Data-reactid =" 42 ">Approximately 6% of people still live with HBV, but most children and adolescents are protected. In Sub-Saharan Africa, where 6% of the population is also infected, less than one-tenth of children receive the vaccine.

Shutterstock Photo Vaccination

Similarly, the African region occupies the last place in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of people living with this virus. "It is a critical time for the region," says Matthews, who also believes there are many differences between scientists in understanding the prevalence and incidence of hepatitis in vulnerable populations.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0m) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = Kenneth Kabagambewho founded it Ugandan National Organization for People Living with Hepatitis B (NOPLHB) in 2011, experienced this experience when diagnosed in 2012. His physician left him. They both treat them as if they had Ebolu. "Another problem faced is the segregation of the sick Kenneth Kabagambe, who founded the National Organization for People with Hepatitis B (NOPLHB) in Uganda. In 2011, he experienced this experience when he was diagnosed in 2012. His doctor left him and healed them, like should Ebola.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0e) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em)Kabagambe has learned that hepatitis can fly for years without causing obvious problems until it causes cirrhosis or liver cancer, but "hepatitis B diagnosed does not define your end," he says. "You can improve.""data-reactid =" 71 ">Kabagambe has learned that hepatitis can fly for years without causing obvious problems until it causes cirrhosis or liver cancer, but "hepatitis B diagnosed does not define your end," he says. "You can improve."

His work for several years has focused on the visibility of this disease and the same level of attention as other viruses.

Also, educate yourself about HBV and get people who suffer to talk about it. It is only in this way that the silent epidemic with the high cost of ever-growing human lives in the threatened areas will cease to exist.


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