How can a kiss kill in the Schoolies week



QUEENSLAND schools are urged to get a vaccine against Meningococcus B over fears after postgraduate celebrations, increasing the risk of death of a potentially fatal disease.

The government in Queensland has refused to fund B-vaccinations for juveniles after being refused for inclusion in the National Immunization Program.

But one of the country's leading disease experts wants schools or their parents to pay for vaccination to get young people out of the morgue.

National Center for Research on Immunization Head of Clinical Research, Robert Booy, said it was important for parents not to underestimate the dangers of B simply because they were not included in the vaccinations for Queensland.

Schoolchildren are encouraged to obtain meningococcal B vaccine.

Schoolchildren are encouraged to obtain meningococcal B vaccine.

"Do not make a mistake, put you in a morgue and I recommend schools to go to the doctor and pay for the injection. Young people who suffer and smoke and mingle closely with people in the crowd should be protected. years, "said Professor Booy Courier-Mail.

"While it may take 10 days to get the full effect of the vaccine, it is worth going to school facilities this weekend to get immediate to help protect the bacteria," he said.

Earlier this year, Queensland Health ruled out South Australia's leadership by adding B for children and young people to their free kicks.

The number of meningococcal cases in the state is over 30 years this year.

Kissing, in addition to sharing cigarettes and drinks, can spread the fatal illness. Image: Lindsay Moller

Kissing, in addition to sharing cigarettes and drinks, can spread the fatal illness. Image: Lindsay Moller

The Australian Academy of Sciences is currently urging parents to vaccinate their children against all five tribes of meningococcal disease, peaked in Adelaide cases and the death of a seven-year-old boy in southwest Sydney.

The Academy's Call follows a new video campaign that was developed in collaboration with the Australian Ministry of Health to educate consumers and health care professionals about the disease.

Spring is the peak time for illness among children and children under five, and adolescents and young adults aged 15-24 years among the most at risk. People with a suppressed immune system, smokers and those living in crowded accommodation are also at greater risk.

Schoolgirls on the beach in Surfers Paradise. Picture: Mike Batterham

Schoolgirls on the beach in Surfers Paradise. Picture: Mike Batterham

Professor Booy, part of the campaign, said there were five common tribes of meningococcal disease in Australia: A, B, C, W, and Y.

"Last year, we saw an increase in W (strain), which caused nearly 150 cases last year, and the Y (tribe) increase that led to 75 cases last year," said Professor Booy.

The total number of notifications at national level has increased from 0.5 per 100,000 population in 2013 to more than 1.5 per 100,000 in 2017.

Queensland Health stated that the Pharmacovigilance Advisory Committee twice rejected proposals to include Vaccine B in the National Immunization Program.


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