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Stanford scientists use virtual reality to help save the current world




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Stanford oxygenation is experiencing virtual reality simulation (VR)Stanford Virtual Laboratory of Human Interaction

Climate expressions such as "2C threshold" and "acidification of the ocean" are hardly evocative. But the consequences of these phenomena can easily be overcome: hundreds of millions of people assumed that they lost their lives next year 11 years due to climate change. About 75% of all people can die deadly heat waves until 2100. Stanford scientists believe that virtual reality (VR) is an effective tool for making abstract climate threats more visceral and personal than the consequences of climate change become life threatening visceral and personal. Today is in the magazine Frontiers in Psychology shows how VR is a technological kick in an empathic center that galvanizes us to eat before it's too late.

Study; studies

Researchers used VR devices for consumer level and simulation of VR simulation from Stanford Ocean Acidification Experience (SOAE) in four different experiments. Participants included 270 students of secondary, university and postgraduate students and adult participants at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016.

SOAE describes the impacts of climate change on our marine ecosystems. The simulation is available to the public for download free, relax. You can choose between being an avatars avatar or a piece of pink coral that lives your best life on an underwater cliff. That is, until you and all of your colorful underwater friends start to die. The simulation time will spend the underwater holocaust up to a removable interval. In one version, the narrator's voice brings you:

Look at your right palm. Notice how the acidity corroded the shell of the sea snail. Take a moment to stroll and see the sea snails in this area. Can not find any? That's because there are no living sea snails here. In this environment they can not survive. Acidification of the ocean will have a serious impact on all excluded species, including oysters, clams, corals and certain plankton species. Without these species, the entire food network may collapse. "

See study and SOAE clips:

Results

Participants test ocean acidification scores after the simulation has increased by more than 100%. Information on acidification of the ocean has been tested and retention has been proven more than three weeks later. The more participants participated in the simulation, the more information they retained. & Nbsp;

Postdoctoral researcher Geraldine Fauville says the team is working on the act act of the simulation element, exploring "concrete steps that individuals can think and implement in their everyday lives." In marketing science, this is the most important step in selling a message. Climate scientists and CoR engineers could benefit from Don Draper recruiting from marketing science to convince people to click on the "Act Now!" Button. & Nbsp;

Unexpected findings

"In VR's history, we talked a lot about how to use it for education," says Jeremy Bailenson, a cognitive psychologist, founding director of Stanford University's Virtual Laboratory for Human Interaction, and co-author of this article. He says the study proves that "you can successfully install the VR into the curriculum, people enjoy it, they learn, there are no negative consequences." This finding was awaited. What was interesting and unexpected is why the VR apparently increases knowledge and empathy. "In two of the four studies in this paper, we can predict how many people care about the environment and how much they want to learn more about the environment based on how much they move their bodies in simulation." In VR studies, this is referred to as "embodied knowledge," and Bailenson thinks it is the mechanism that causes the message to resonate. "The moving body is a secret sauce and what makes the VR special," says Bailenson, while observing that the findings are correlative, not necessarily causal.

From Stanford Paper: "Participants who have explored more virtual space have developed deeper cognitive associations with scientific content."

Today's study comes at the bottom of an unrelated document published last month by the Nobel Prize laureate and his team at the Max Planck Institute in Germany that thinking uses the navigation system of the brain and that knowledge is organized spatially.

Impact

The participants announced the generally positive experience of the CoR. "It's pretty pretty, quite sensitive," 18-year-old Cameron Chapman says. "I definitely felt like I was underwater."

"It was much more realistic than I expected," Alexa Levison, senior colleague, says. "I'm a visual pupil. The ocean acidification is happening differently than just that."

Similar enthusiasm appeared at the Tribeca Film Festival:

Jane Rosenthal runs this event where it's the wing of the VR Festival and there are dozens of cabins where you can go in and do the VR, "says & nbsp;Bailenson. "The festival takes about a week. It is open from late morning to evening. We had a number of adults who sometimes had 100 people. They wait for an hour, sometimes two hours, to learn about chemistry. "

The team presented the SOAE to Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, Congressman Suzanne Bonamici of Oregon, and former senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas. "This simulation shows a rich detail of the damage caused by carbon pollution in our oceans," Whitehouse said after a Capitol Hill event organized by the Ocean Conservancy Environmental Protection Organization. "I appreciate the experience of the Stanford Acidification of the Oceans that I draw attention to the dangers facing our oceans and what we need to do to protect them."

The CoR will not change the overwhelming commitment to climate denial:

"I was lucky to have a US congressman come to the lab and actually have experience of acidifying the ocean," says Bailenson, the congressman is vocal climate change. "Served in our army, he came to the lab and was very respectful, he did two dozen demos, where he really they did it. He did not just walk. "The congressman was cooperative and committed, but when Bailenson asked for feedback on the CoR's climate education, the answer he received was as depressing as the corroded sea snail:

Let me do it right, "Bailenson said," I paraphrase. I did not notice it, so I have no direct feeling. The general conception of what he said is, you think you're presenting me with science. What I see you present is what we call democratic sciences. This is the capital D on democracy. It means that you are choosing a sort of science that resonates with the Democrats, but that is not universal. I have not heard this term before. I heard it already because I obviously saw it. It was so chaotic that I was at work for some time. Stanford's acidification of the oceans has been intensively explored by many scientists, our great colleagues, [marine scientists] Kristy Kroeker and Fio Micheli. All this is based on their work, where every detail of how many centimeters this snail is from this type of coral, all these details, "Bailenson's bitch." We spent a lot of time and effort, and just that the polarization is so high, that marine science is disappointed as a democratic, not a peak. "

The congressman advised Bailenson on what he could do otherwise to convince people of climate change and its consequences.

He was careful not to get into the scientific details of climate change models in particular. Because I do not think he would play things he enjoyed. He talked about the issue of climate change that he always has an influence on his constituents. In his district fracking is very large and natural gas is very large. He asked me to try to make the CoR reports on environmental protection to show clearly how it does not break the economic goals. "

The second was one that Bailenson heard before defining an interview on how climate change affects changes in migratory patterns and how it affects things like hunting season. "Overall, this was an interview when a man who had an amazing record that served our country, who was a very important legislator who really tried, eventually refused what we posed as a democratic science."

Using the CoR, Bailenson has been able to educate officials on the island of Palau about negative impacts on the environment. You can read about his work, which affects conservation legislators in an article written by Bailenson National geography.

Learn more about the CoR experiments, education, and environmental protection at Bailenson Virtual Interaction Lab at Stanford University.

* Funding for this research was provided by the Gordon Foundation and Betty Moore.

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Stanford oxygenation is experiencing virtual reality simulation (VR)Stanford Virtual Laboratory of Human Interaction

Climate expressions such as "2C threshold" and "acidification of the ocean" are hardly evocative. But the consequences of these phenomena can easily be overcome: hundreds of millions of people assumed that they lost their lives next year 11 years due to climate change. About 75% of all people can die deadly heat waves until 2100. Stanford scientists believe that virtual reality (VR) is an effective tool for making abstract climate threats more visceral and personal than the consequences of climate change become life threatening visceral and personal. Today is in the magazine Frontiers in Psychology shows how VR is a technological kick in an empathic center that galvanizes us to eat before it's too late.

Study; studies

Researchers used VR devices for consumer level and simulation of VR simulation from Stanford Ocean Acidification Experience (SOAE) in four different experiments. Participants included 270 students of secondary, university and postgraduate students and adult participants at the Tribeca Film Festival in 2016.

SOAE describes the impacts of climate change on our marine ecosystems. The simulation is available to the public for download free, relax. You can choose between being an avatars avatar or a piece of pink coral that lives your best life on an underwater cliff. That is, until you and all of your colorful underwater friends start to die. The simulation time will spend the underwater holocaust up to a removable interval. In one version, the narrator's voice brings you:

Look at your right palm. Notice how the acidity corroded the shell of the sea snail. Take a moment to stroll and see the sea snails in this area. Can not find any? That's because there are no living sea snails here. In this environment they can not survive. Acidification of the ocean will have a serious impact on all excluded species, including oysters, clams, corals and certain plankton species. Without these species, the entire food network may collapse. "

See study and SOAE clips:

Results

Participants test ocean acidification scores after the simulation has increased by more than 100%. Information on acidification of the ocean has been tested and retention has been proven more than three weeks later. The more participants participate in the simulation, the more information they will keep.

Postdoctoral researcher Geraldine Fauville says the team is working on the act act of the simulation element and exploring "concrete steps that individuals can think and implement in their everyday lives." In marketing science, this is the most important step in selling a message. Climate scientists and VR engineers could potentially benefit from the recruitment of marketing scientists to persuade humanity to click on the "Act Now!" Button.

Unexpected findings

"In VR's history, we talked a lot about how to use it for education," says Jeremy Bailenson, a cognitive psychologist, founding director of Stanford University's Virtual Laboratory for Human Interaction, and co-author of this article. He says the study proves that "you can successfully install the VR into the curriculum, people enjoy it, they learn, there are no negative consequences." This finding was awaited. What was interesting and unexpected is why the VR apparently increases knowledge and empathy. "In two of the four studies in this paper, we can predict how many people care about the environment and how much they want to learn more about the environment based on how much they move their bodies in simulation." In VR studies, this is referred to as "embodied knowledge," and Bailenson thinks it is the mechanism that causes the message to resonate. "The moving body is a secret sauce and what makes the VR special," says Bailenson, while observing that the findings are correlative, not necessarily causal.

From Stanford Paper: "Participants who have explored more virtual space have developed deeper cognitive associations with scientific content."

Today's study comes at the bottom of an unrelated document published last month by the Nobel Prize laureate and his team at the Max Planck Institute in Germany that thinking uses the navigation system of the brain and that knowledge is organized spatially.

Impact

The participants announced the generally positive experience of the CoR. "It's pretty pretty, quite sensitive," 18-year-old Cameron Chapman says. "I definitely felt like I was underwater."

"It was much more realistic than I expected," Alexa Levison, senior colleague, says. "I'm a visual pupil. The ocean acidification is happening differently than just that."

Similar enthusiasm appeared at the Tribeca Film Festival:

Jane Rosenthal runs this event where there is a crossroads of the VR Festival and there are dozens of booths where you can go and do the CoR, "says Bailenson. "The festival takes about a week. It is open from late morning to evening. We had a number of adults who sometimes had 100 people. They wait for an hour, sometimes two hours, to learn about chemistry. "

The team presented the SOAE to Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, Congressman Suzanne Bonamici of Oregon, and former senator Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas. "This simulation shows a rich detail of the damage caused by carbon pollution in our oceans," Whitehouse said after a Capitol Hill event organized by the Ocean Conservancy Environmental Protection Organization. "I appreciate the experience of the Stanford Acidification of the Oceans that I draw attention to the dangers facing our oceans and what we need to do to protect them."

The CoR will not change the overwhelming commitment to climate denial:

"I was lucky to have a US congressman come to the lab and actually have experience of acidifying the ocean," says Bailenson, the congressman is vocal climate change. "Served in our army, he came to the lab and was very respectful, he did two dozen demos, where he really they did it. He did not just walk. "The congressman was cooperative and committed, but when Bailenson asked for feedback on the CoR's climate education, the answer he received was as depressing as the corroded sea snail:

Let me do it right, "Bailenson said," I paraphrase. I did not notice it, so I have no direct feeling. The general conception of what he said is, you think you're presenting me with science. What I see you present is what we call democratic sciences. This is the capital D on democracy. It means that you are choosing a sort of science that resonates with the Democrats, but that is not universal. I have not heard this term before. I heard it already because I obviously saw it. It was so chaotic that I was at work for some time. Stanford's acidification of the oceans has been intensively explored by many scientists, our great colleagues, [marine scientists] Kristy Kroeker and Fio Micheli. All this is based on their work, where every detail of how many centimeters this snail is from this type of coral, all these details, "Bailenson's bitch." We spent a lot of time and effort, and just that the polarization is so high, that marine science is disappointed as a democratic, not a peak. "

The congressman advised Bailenson on what he could do otherwise to convince people of climate change and its consequences.

He was careful not to get into the scientific details of climate change models in particular. Because I do not think he would play things he enjoyed. He talked about the issue of climate change that he always has an influence on his constituents. In his district fracking is very large and natural gas is very large. He asked me to try to make the CoR reports on environmental protection to show clearly how it does not break the economic goals. "

The second was one that Bailenson heard before defining an interview on how climate change affects changes in migratory patterns and how it affects things like hunting season. "Overall, this was an interview when a man who had an amazing record that served our country, who was a very important legislator who really tried, eventually refused what we posed as a democratic science."

Using the CoR, Bailenson has been able to educate officials on the island of Palau about negative impacts on the environment. You can read about his work, which affects conservation legislators in an article written by Bailenson National geography.

Learn more about the CoR experiments, education, and environmental protection at Bailenson Virtual Laboratory of Human Interactions at Stanford University.

* Funding for this research was provided by the Gordon Foundation and Betty Moore.


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