Alternative proteins: threat or taste of the future?



When Air New Zealand announced in July that it would serve Impossible Burger, a plant-based product that imitates beef on its flight to Los Angeles to Auckland for years, most nations have given collective fear of horror.

New Zealand should promote its beefed beef to its domestic carrier, not to any US nesting facility.

This has been reflected in the agricultural sector, in the red meat sector, even in several Members.

New Zealand's Patterson brand called the "faint face" for the New Zealand red meat industry and invited Air New Zealand to introduce New Zealand products to international visitors instead.

READ MORE:
* Impossible Burger predicts that animal meat will be out of menu for 17 years * Air NZ hinders Impossible Burger again
* Bleeding, plant-based Impossible Burger debuts in New York City

National Party spokesman Nathan Guy expressed disappointment over Twitter.

"We produce the most delicious steaks and lambs on the planet – GMO and hormone-free. National carriers should promote our premium products and help sell New Zealand to the world," Guy explained.

Beef and Lamb New Zealand (B + LNZ) said that kiwi farmers have a legitimate feeling of excitement and disgust and federal farmers have said there are domestic products that could be promoted.

No meat mill is the spirit of Dunedin's Craft Meat Company, which says it's a response to the growing demand for a meat-free alternative.

SUPPLIED

No meat mill is the spirit of Dunedin's Craft Meat Company, which says it's a response to the growing demand for a meat-free alternative.

So what is the hamburger that causes such a hand?

The unreal Burger, so realistic that it even seems to "bleed" is far from what's going on in the egg, and quickly got into restaurants all over America – almost 2500 of them.

It was seven years under the guidance of American biochemist Patrick Brown and supported by large investors; Bill Gates is one.

Brown's breakthrough came when he discovered "blood" from an iron-rich molecule known as the heme found in both animals and plants.

When he shoots on the grate, he makes it brown from the red to brown color, as true and delicious, Brown says. The rest of the ingredients include wheat, coconut oil and potatoes.

In an interview for Time Brown said he wanted to win the omnivores with plant products that were "so tasty, nutritious and affordable that they completely replace animal meat by 2035."

Hereford cattle at Chris Jeffries farm in northern Canterbury. Research clearly shows significant opportunities for our sheep and beef sector if we respond well.

Chris Jeffries

Hereford cattle at Chris Jeffries farm in northern Canterbury. Research clearly shows significant opportunities for our sheep and beef sector if we respond well.

"The use of animals as a food production technology is responsible for greater greenhouse gas emissions than for the whole transport system, which uses more water and pollutes more water than any other technology.

"It now occupies almost half of the land of the whole land, both for growing crops, for feeding animals or for grazing." The cows themselves predominate above all other land-based salvation that remains on the ground. "

Closer home, a few months ago, "meat without grinding" hit the Kiwi supermarkets. The product is a spiritual heritage of the Dunedin & Craft Meat Company, which says it's in response to the growing demand for a meat-free alternative.

Vegetable coins use ingredients such as mushrooms, tomatoes, almonds, coconut oil and soy protein and look and taste like coins.

"My daughter two years ago became a vegan and asked me to do something she could eat, and I realized that people tend to eat less meat or eat no meat at all," says co-owner Grant Howie.

Howie says that 30 percent of New Zealand's population reduces the consumption of animal products and demand for vegan food is on the rise. Australia is the third largest vegan market in the world, and this trend is reflected in New Zealand.

Impossible burger offered by Air New Zealand on his flight to Auckland. That caused a lot of upset.

SUPPLIED

Impossible burger offered by Air New Zealand on his flight to Auckland. That caused a lot of upset.

So this booming plant protein irritation will affect our red meat industry? Ministry of Primary Industry (MPI) and Joint Research on Plant and Food Studies The development of plant proteins says yes.

While meat continues to appeal to "traditional" consumers, there is an increasing demand for a more sustainable and healthier lifestyle that promotes plant protein products, the report said.

"There has been a new wave of meat and milk replacers that are already on the market or are about to release and therefore do not need animal protein," says Jocelyn Eason, a researcher at Plant & Food Research.

"To keep New Zealand competitive, we want to make sure that we are looking forward to what the future consumer wants from our products and what are the opportunities for our sector."

"The global plant-based protein market is set to $ 10.8 billion by 2022."

The US beef market is crucial for New Zealand, accounting for 44% of total beef exports. If both China and the US reduced their meat imports by just one percentage point, meat imports would decrease by $ 134 million and $ 113 million.

This would reduce New Zealand's exports by 29 billion NZ, which is 9 billion NZ more than the operating profit of Alliance Meats, one of the country's largest meat processors.

Beef and lamb NZ also reported on the potential threat of plant proteins.

The report on the future of meat states that it is likely to become the main competitor of some of the red meat products of this country and that the sector must come up with this problem.

"There is a series of forces that lead governments and consumers to look for alternatives to the red mass, including environmental concerns associated with climate change and the ability to feed the growing world population in a sustainable way, the use of animals in food and the place of meat in a modern diet . "

The report found that although plant proteins are produced in small volumes, large-scale production of hamburger and milling is probably a reality within five years.

Chicken "sunflower" meat made from pea protein. There is growing concern about a more sustainable and healthier lifestyle that promotes plant proteins. products

Chicken "sunflower" meat made from pea protein. There is growing concern about a more sustainable and healthier lifestyle that promotes plant proteins. products

The author of the report, Lee-Ann Marsh, says she wants to see how the red mass industry is meeting "how it is doing what it does today to deal with the opportunities that are highlighted in the report."

"It is extremely important to take advantage of our competitive advantage and protect it – natural hormone-free, hormone-free, natural-free protein – to get higher premiums and increase the value of our exports," he says.

"Yes, we have some way to go. A large part of our red meat does not show premiums and low consumer awareness of New Zealand's natural farming systems."

Westpac economist Anne Boniface argues that it is not a question of whether, but when, the increasing availability of alternative proteins will have a significant impact on the New Zealand farming sector, but "getting closer to the size, scope and timing of impacts is much stricter.

"There is no doubt that New Zealand farmers will have to continue their" smarter "operations, and the most important is the use of technologies that reduce the impact of their farms on the environment.

The American beef market is crucial for New Zealand, accounting for 44% of total beef exports.

SUPPLIED

The American beef market is crucial for New Zealand, accounting for 44% of total beef exports.

"They will have to adapt to changes in consumer demand, adapt their offerings and help shape how these preferences change and will have to be able to distinguish their offers on the global scene by making use of New Zealand's strong international reputation and business relations with strategic economies, such as China.

If plant proteins are not boring enough, consider "synthetic" meat.

We also call meat flesh, pure meat, juice, meat fed in laboratories and meat in vitro, is grown in cell cultures instead of inside animals. It is a form of cellular agriculture.

Partly due to technical problems associated with scaling and cost reduction, the cultivated meat was not yet commercially exploited. Production costs, however, have fallen from $ 300,000 per kilogram to just $ 12 per kilogram. But it still needs to be seen whether consumers will accept the meat as meat.

TV1 made a question about whether people would eat synthetic meat … and 90 percent said they did not.

Food and agriculture specialist Rosie Bosworth calls "clean meat". Under the microscope it is identical to real meat, she said.

Cattle at Muller in natural non-hormone-free hormone-free protein in Marlborough.

Muller station

Cattle at Muller in natural non-hormone-free hormone-free protein in Marlborough.

"It's not synthetic, there are no hormones, antibiotics or faeces."

A small animal DNA tampon is inserted into a nutritious broth that allows it to grow and multiply on parts of the meat. One once in size is attached to a "scaffolding" that helps him take the form of a real animal piece of meat, whether steak, chicken breast or minced meat.

There are many benefits of laboratory meat, Bosworth said. Long shelf life because there are no bacteria, pathogens and faeces associated with slaughterhouses that can contaminate the meat. It can be grown in cities in brewery situations. There are less illnesses, fewer hormones – the benefits are endless.

"Here's a couple of things," he says.

"It is called synthetic meat, but it has to be educated about what it is and what it is not. It is not synthetic meat, DNA is the same, the New Zealand population is used to pastorally raised meat and has a generation of baby boomers that is really associated with a source his meals.

"But there is this forthcoming millennial market that is not used to premium New Zealand products, consumers who have clean meat." And what about fast food outlets?

A large part of our red meat does not claim the premium, and consumers have a low awareness of New Zealand's natural farming systems.

DAVID UNWIN / STUFF

A large part of our red meat does not claim the premium, and consumers have a low awareness of New Zealand's natural farming systems.

The last word comes from Beef + Lamb CEO Sam McIvor.

Technology to produce an alternative protein burger ready for the consumer is here, he says. Research also clearly shows significant opportunities for our sheep and beef sector if we respond well.

"It's because the same forces that drive investment and the demand for alternative protein production give us a chance to distinguish New Zealand's red meat from the international market.

"The world's population is growing and it is estimated that one billion more people will be fed by 2030. The total agricultural production of New Zealand can only feed about 40 million people, and we can not and do not want to feed the world – we can go that alternative proteins in this growing market as well as red meat. "


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