Time is Money: Asprey Wristwatch is sold for nearly $ 3.9 million



GENEVA (Reuters) – On Tuesday, a unique vintage watch was unveiled in Geneva on Tuesday at auction at 3.915 million Swiss francs ($ 3.88 million). Competitor Sotheby's has announced the world record for a hectic offer.

FILE PHOTOGRAPHY: "Asprey", Patek Philippe Perpetual Calendar Chronograph Watch Reference 2499, is displayed during a print preview before the upcoming auction at Sotheby's in Geneva on November 7, 2018. REUTERS / Denis Balibouse / Photo File

Produced in 1952 by Patek Philippe and bought four years later in Asprey's – the only one of its kind sold in London – Swiss watches are eternal calendar chronographs.

"Asprey" was a star between 250 clocks and pocket watches, including Cartier, Rolex and Vacheron Constantin, on a block in a semi-annual auction.

Tuesday's anonymous vendor bought the auction at a record 2.2 million Swiss francs ($ 2.21 million) in 2006, and this time he had a pre-sales estimate of $ 2 to $ 4 million.

The identity of the buyer was not immediately known, but the successful bidder was a young Asian woman in torn jeans at the back of a store that spoke Chinese to her cell phone.

"The world record price for the reference model (Patek Philippe) 2499. Sold," said Sam Hines, global director of the Sotheby Watch division.

The original owner, whose initials, R.C., are engraved on the back of yellow gold, were probably received for their 21st birthday. It was not even identified, says the auction house.

Watches that were pre-sales on a marketing tour in Asia and Dubai are on a brown leather belt and offer day and date, stopwatch and phase of the moon.

Hines, who was asked to cool the Chinese luxury market in a less ostentatious era under the government's fight against corruption, told Reuters before selling: "We have clients in China, it's true that the kind of need is less ostentatious, tastes are more conservative. watch really meets a new taste. "

All clock sales were 12.2 million francs, Sotheby's said.

($ 1 = 1.0089 Swiss francs)

Stephanie Nebehay's Report; edit by John Stonestreet

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