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The Vikings brought LEPROSY to Ireland in the 10th century



During the 10,000 years since the Stone Age people arrived, the Irish established clear cultural areas.

Researchers have recently found 23 distinct genetic clusters, separated by geography, by comparing mutations from nearly 1,000 Irish genomes with more than 6,000 from Britain and continental Europe.

These are most different in Western Ireland, but less pronounced in the East, where historical migration erases genetic variations.

They also detected genes from Europe and calculated the timing of historical migrations of Norwegian Vikings and Anglo-Normans to Ireland, which gave data corresponding to historical records.

The Vikings left their genetic trail in Ireland when they attacked the island and started their first attack in 795 after the island monastery had been raided. In the eighties, the Vikings began to establish permanent boats along the coast

The Vikings left their genetic trail in Ireland when they attacked the island and started their first attack in 795 after the island monastery had been raided. In the eighties, the Vikings began to establish permanent boats along the coast

The study portrays a new and more complex image of the genetic landscape in Ireland and demonstrates the signatures that historical migration left behind in the modern Irish genome.

The Vikings left their genetic trail in Ireland when they attacked the island and started their first attack in 795 after the island monastery had been raided.

Vikings continued small attacks on unprotected coastal monasteries before sailing to the Shannon River in the 1930s to steal from inland religious settlements.

In the eighties, the Vikings began to set up permanent shipping bases along the coast, from which they could dust all year round.

Norwegian influence in Ireland began to decline at the time of the rise of King Brian Boru (depicted in an imaginary depiction)

Norwegian influence in Ireland began to decline at the time of the rise of King Brian Boru (depicted in an imaginary depiction)

The Vikings also enslaved one of the Irish people and were able to attack the country by exploiting the fact that Ireland was particularly politically broken.

However, the Vikings did not manage the island – until the middle of the 10th century they could not rule the territory of Ireland.

The broken political system in Ireland worked for the island – if one ruler had been killed, it destabilized the whole island.

Norwegian influence in Ireland began to decline at the time of the rise of King Brian Boru.

In 968, Viking rejected the city of Limerick and became Cork, Wexford and Waterford.

In 1014, the Royal Army led the Vikings and their allies at the Battle of Clontarf outside Dublin, but a small group of Norsemans killed an older species when he prayed in his tent after the battle.

Viking remained in Ireland after agreeing to pay but the Viking Age in Ireland did not reach the definitive end until the Norman invasion of the 1970s and the last Norwegian King of Norway escaped to the Orkney Islands.

Source: History.com – Globetrotting Vikings: Influx of Ireland


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