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Charlie Lee, creator of Litecoin, will make the currency more substitutable and private



Charlie Lee, creator of Litecoin (LTC), said he would focus on making crowning currency more representative tweet January 28.

Lee said in a tweet that "substitutability is the only property of hard money missing in Bitcoin and Litecoin," adding that "the next battlefield will be functioning and privacy."

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The conclusion of the tweet is that the developer wants to focus on realizing private transactions in Litecoin, saying:

"Now I focus on making Litecoin more interchangeable by adding confidential transactions."

In response to another tweet in the same thread, Lee he explained that confidential transactions could be added to Litecoin via a soft fork. Soft bifurcation is a modification made in the source code of a cryptogram that does not result in blockade distribution, as occurs in hard bifurcations.

Read also showed in the same subtext when the update will be implemented "sometime in 2019".

Do not Stop Reading: What is a "hard fork"?

Functionality is the property of money, which means that each unit of a given asset has exactly the same value as any other asset of the same type and unit. As previously reported by Cointelegraph, bituminous functionality (BTC) has previously been questioned when battles are particularly "polluted" by their involvement in crime, which may reduce their value.

So-called data protection standards, such as Monero (XMR), Zcash (ZEC) and Dash (DASH), were created to improve the perceived problems with Bitcoin and other altcoins, such as lack of anonymity and substitutability.

At present, Litecoin is the seventh largest market-capitalization cryptocrucier with a growth rate of around 2 percent a day until closing.

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