Flu Update: Influenza activity in Delaware remains low. Officials also recommend vaccination against influenza



Flu Update: Influenza activity in Delaware remains low. Officials also recommend vaccination against influenza – the state of Delaware News<! – ->




News | Date published: Friday 9 November 2018

DOVER – After the first full month of flu season 2018-2019, influenza activity in Delaware is low. There have been 42 laboratory-confirmed flu cases in the state since the start of the 30 September season. The largest number of cases, 20, were reported in Kent County, accounting for 47.6 percent of all cases. New Castle County reports 14 cases (33.3%) and Sussex County reports eight cases (19.0%). Since the beginning of the flu season, there have been 15 hospitalizations, including two children. Eighty-eight percent of the confirmed cases laboratories are the A. influenza strain. In Delaware, there were no reports of influenza-related deaths at this time.

While activity is currently low, the public health division (VAT) continues to remind Delawareans to get their flu vaccine if they have not done so.

"Although this flu season is currently not expected to be nearly as severe as last year, you should not postpone your flu vaccine," said Dr. Karyl Rattay. "While flu is unpredictable, it is predictable that getting an annual influenza vaccine can prevent you from getting flu and spreading it to your family, friends, neighbors and coworkers."
The influenza vaccine is recommended for Delawareans aged 6 months and older. Since it takes about two weeks to vaccinate the antibodies that protect against influenza virus infection, it is important that you be vaccinated as soon as possible to give the body time to build up immunity. Obtaining a flu vaccine now also provides protection throughout the flu season.
During the flu season of 2017-2018, Delaware recorded 9,041 cases of influenza (including the above), the highest number of laboratory confirmed cases of influenza since the record of 2005 and 35 deaths related to influenza.

VAT offers the possibility of vaccination throughout the season, including its public health clinics. The plan can be found at https://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/fluclinics.html. Influenza vaccines are also offered through doctors' surgeries, many pharmacies and some grocery stores. To find out where the flu vaccines are being offered, enter "Google Flu Search Engines" and enter the postcode. VAT provided 171 influenza vaccines at a community clinic at the Porter State Service Center in October and 1100 at its Flu Depression Clinic in front of DelDOT.
The flu is easily portable and can also be obtained from seemingly healthy but unvaccinated children and adults. Vaccination not only prevents people from getting flu, but can also reduce the severity of influenza illness and prevent visits to a doctor, clinic, alertness along with hospitalization and serious consequences (including death) for influenza. Vaccinated people have a lesser chance of missing family, school, and occupational causes due to influenza illness.

In addition to Delawareans receiving annual flu, it can prevent the spread of flu and other respiratory illnesses with good hygiene: often wash your hands with soap and water, or use disinfectants on your hands with alcohol, cover coughing and sneezing with tissues, and dispose of tissues immediately. If there is no tissue, cough or bite into the inner elbow. Drops from sneezing can travel up to six feet. Also, do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth. Keep your distance from people who cough or sneeze.
Symptoms of the flu suddenly appear and include fever, cough, sore throat, dry or debilitated nose, headaches and pains in the body, chills and fatigue. Some people get complications including pneumonia, bronchitis and sinus infections and ear infections. Those who are ill with flu should stay home from work, school and other meetings and do not return until they are fever – at a temperature lower than 100 ° F (37.8 ° C) without taking any medication that reduces the fever for at least 24 hours .

Avoid close contact with people in the home and stay well hydrated by drinking plenty of water and other pure fluids. Medicaments that are available without a prescription may relieve the symptoms, but if you suspect you have a flu, call your doctor as he may decide to provide antiviral medicines to help speed up recovery and prevent serious complications. This is especially important for those who feel very ill, are pregnant or have chronic health conditions.

For more information about the flu and where to vaccinate, go to flu.delaware.gov or call 1-800-282-8672.
A person who is deaf, deaf, deaf or hard of hearing can call the VAT number listed above via the TTY service. Dial 7-1-1 or 800-232-5460 and enter your conversation with the transmission operator who reads your conversation with the person hearing the VAT. The relay operator enters the spoken word of the auditory person back to the TTY user. For more information on TLA availability in Delaware, visit http://delawarerelay.com.

Delaware Health and Social Services has committed itself to improving the quality of life of citizens in Delaware by supporting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency and protecting vulnerable populations. VAT, a division of DHSS, calls on Delawareans to make a healthier choice of the 5-2-1 campaign almost none: eating 5 or more kinds of fruit and vegetables a day, not having more than 2 hours of recreational screens each day (including television, playing games), gain daily 1 or more hours of physical activity and do not drink almost any sweet drinks.

Related topics: DE Public Health Department, Delaware Public Health Division, Public Health Department, Flu, Health, Health and Safety, Flu

News | Date published: Friday 9 November 2018

DOVER – After the first full month of flu season 2018-2019, influenza activity in Delaware is low. There have been 42 laboratory-confirmed flu cases in the state since the start of the 30 September season. The largest number of cases, 20, were reported in Kent County, accounting for 47.6 percent of all cases. New Castle County reports 14 cases (33.3%) and Sussex County reports eight cases (19.0%). Since the beginning of the flu season, there have been 15 hospitalizations, including two children. Eighty-eight percent of the confirmed cases laboratories are the A. influenza strain. In Delaware, there were no reports of influenza-related deaths at this time.

While activity is currently low, the public health division (VAT) continues to remind Delawareans to get their flu vaccine if they have not done so.

"Although this flu season is currently not expected to be nearly as severe as last year, you should not postpone your flu vaccine," said Dr. Karyl Rattay. "While flu is unpredictable, it is predictable that getting an annual influenza vaccine can prevent you from getting flu and spreading it to your family, friends, neighbors and coworkers."
The influenza vaccine is recommended for Delawareans aged 6 months and older. Since it takes about two weeks to vaccinate the antibodies that protect against influenza virus infection, it is important that you be vaccinated as soon as possible to give the body time to build up immunity. Obtaining a flu vaccine now also provides protection throughout the flu season.
During the flu season of 2017-2018, Delaware recorded 9,041 cases of influenza (including the above), the highest number of laboratory confirmed cases of influenza since the record of 2005 and 35 deaths related to influenza.

VAT offers the possibility of vaccination throughout the season, including its public health clinics. The plan can be found at https://dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/fluclinics.html. Influenza vaccines are also offered through doctors' surgeries, many pharmacies and some grocery stores. To find out where the flu vaccines are being offered, enter "Google Flu Search Engines" and enter the postcode. VAT provided 171 influenza vaccines at a community clinic at the Porter State Service Center in October and 1100 at its Flu Depression Clinic in front of DelDOT.
The flu is easily portable and can also be obtained from seemingly healthy but unvaccinated children and adults. Vaccination not only prevents people from getting flu, but can also reduce the severity of influenza illness and prevent visits to a doctor, clinic, alertness along with hospitalization and serious consequences (including death) for influenza. Vaccinated people have a lesser chance of missing family, school, and occupational causes due to influenza illness.

In addition to Delawareans receiving annual flu, it can prevent the spread of flu and other respiratory illnesses with good hygiene: often wash your hands with soap and water, or use disinfectants on your hands with alcohol, cover coughing and sneezing with tissues, and dispose of tissues immediately. If there is no tissue, cough or bite into the inner elbow. Drops from sneezing can travel up to six feet. Also, do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth. Keep your distance from people who cough or sneeze.
Symptoms of the flu suddenly appear and include fever, cough, sore throat, dry or debilitated nose, headaches and pains in the body, chills and fatigue. Some people get complications including pneumonia, bronchitis and sinus infections and ear infections. Those who are ill with flu should stay home from work, school and other meetings and do not return until they are fever – at a temperature lower than 100 ° F (37.8 ° C) without taking any medication that reduces the fever for at least 24 hours .

Avoid close contact with people in the home and stay well hydrated by drinking plenty of water and other pure fluids. Medicaments that are available without a prescription may relieve the symptoms, but if you suspect you have a flu, call your doctor as he may decide to provide antiviral medicines to help speed up recovery and prevent serious complications. This is especially important for those who feel very ill, are pregnant or have chronic health conditions.

For more information about the flu and where to vaccinate, go to flu.delaware.gov or call 1-800-282-8672.
A person who is deaf, deaf, deaf or hard of hearing can call the VAT number listed above via the TTY service. Dial 7-1-1 or 800-232-5460 and enter your conversation with the transmission operator who reads your conversation with the person hearing the VAT. The relay operator enters the spoken word of the auditory person back to the TTY user. For more information on TLA availability in Delaware, visit http://delawarerelay.com.

Delaware Health and Social Services has committed itself to improving the quality of life of citizens in Delaware by supporting health and well-being, fostering self-sufficiency and protecting vulnerable populations. VAT, a division of DHSS, calls on Delawareans to make a healthier choice of the 5-2-1 campaign almost none: eating 5 or more kinds of fruit and vegetables a day, not having more than 2 hours of recreational screens each day (including television, playing games), gain daily 1 or more hours of physical activity and do not drink almost any sweet drinks.

Related topics: DE Public Health Department, Delaware Public Health Division, Public Health Department, Flu, Health, Health and Safety, Flu




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