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Olafur Eliasson brought his tunnel fog to Tate Modern | Art and design



A 45-meter-long blinding tunnel tunnel, which will be used by less than a handful of people, will be installed at Tate Modern, part of a huge summer show by artist Olafur Eliasson.

Danish-Icelandic artist is best known for his installation of the Weather Project at the Turbine Hall of the Gallery in 2003. It was one of the most popular installations in the history of Tate Modern, where people lay and swim in dazzling fake sunlight.

Under the heading "The Blind Traveler", in 2010, the fog tunnel will ask questions about human senses. Eliasson said that people tend to go to the tunnel and see that they do not see anything.

Olafur Eliasson is your blind traveler, 2010

"You realize very quickly and I mean literally that you are not completely blind, you have a lot of other senses that are beginning to penetrate," he said.

"It shows that the relativity of our senses is much higher than we think we have to retrain or at least stop being numb."

When he talked about installing the Weather Weather project, the artist discovered that some couples got more than to bathe. Asking whether his fog could be a "tunnel of love," he said it was an opportunity. "We had opportunities that could be described as love beyond the borders," he said.

Tate Modern combines more than 30 works from nearly three decades of Eliasson's works on 1,000 square meters of exhibition space.

Includes the version of the 1994 Moss Wall, which includes Iceland's Great Wall on the Great Wall; Your Spiral View, 2002, an installation that contains the kaleidoscopic mirrors that people are going through; and space for one color, 1997, a strangely yellow room that makes it all.

Installation of the Olafur Eliasson project into the Tate Modern Turbine Hall project.



Installation of the Olafur Eliasson project into the Tate Modern Turbine Hall project. Photo: Dan Chung / The Guardian

In addition to the exhibits, weekly Skype calls are planned between the exhibition visitors and his studio.

Eliasson will work with the Tate Modern catering team to serve at the Terrace Bar as a type of organic, vegetarian and ethical meal that he and his team can eat together every day.

The artist said he also hoped to "colonize" some of Tate Modern's exterior space, even though the details were kept under the folds. In December, Eliasson placed 24 large ice blocks off Greenland outside the gallery to highlight the effects of climate change.

Tate Modern, Achim Borchardt-Hume, director of the exhibition, said the gallery will present Eliasson's largest survey. "I think the extraordinary power of Olafura's work is that he condenses very complex ideas about seemingly simple, extremely accessible images and experiences."

Olafur Eliasson: In real life, Tate Modern, July 11 by 5 January 2020.


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