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Why the Context is the King for innovative Unicef ​​solutions that save lives




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Nurse Pauline Nalutaaya is one of many healthcare workers in Uganda who send weekly health reports using mTrac and minimize costs previously associated with paper reporting.

A few years ago, Unicef ​​met a group of about 40 Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who were looking for creative solutions to some of the most pressing issues facing people in the poorest parts of the world.

But after a week of brain eruptions on the brain, it was clear they were on the wrong path. This week's co-creation has resulted in solutions such as smart app-based subscription applications that would cost people living in poverty a full-day income or water purification solution that should be delivered on a large lorry to remote villages, trails, says Tanya Accone, Senior Innovation Advisor for Unicef, and Deputy Director of the Global Innovation Center in New York

"In other words, these anointed journalists did not come up with the only workable solution because they could not imagine the realities of the world's poorest people," she told me.

"It was a moment when I realized that this context was king and we missed it, maybe we had the right idea, but not all the right people were in the room, and no amount of data could replace the local perspective and expertise. "

South African-born Accone has been working in the development sector for the last 18 years, mostly for the United Nations, as part of and a "collective effort of organizations" such as the United Nations, the Red Cross, governments and the private sector, and is trying to assure " planet, no matter who they are "can be achieved. These include the elimination of poverty, hunger and death that can be prevented; providing access to education, clean water and housing in a healthy environment; and have peace, justice and strong institutions.

There were impressive profits, he says. "Worldwide, today, 17,000 fewer children will die before they die each day in 1990. More than 5 million children die this year before five more birthdays."

In Sub-Saharan Africa, the percentage of children in the age of elementary schools that are not in school, nearly half of them since mid-2000, "but we still have the majority of children outside school than anywhere else in the world."

In South Africa, around two-thirds of all children under the age of 18 reach a grant to support children to meet the conditions for poor children and is the largest money transfer system in Africa. "But we are still the most dangerous country in the world. What has been achieved is good, but it's not good enough."

Tanya Accone, Chief Innovation Advisor for Unicef ​​and Deputy Director of the Global Innovation Center in New YorkUnicef

Over the last seven years, Unicef ​​has been working to explore how innovation, technology, and access to beginnings could undermine development to achieve more with less.

The Unicef ​​team has worked in this way in over 85 countries and has found some particularly innovative ideas in South and East Africa.

Health news

In Kigali, Rwanda, Unicef ​​has begun to work with Nyaruka, a software company, "they understand that in the context of limited availability and increased poverty, SMS or text messages are not just a simplified mobile communications, but that these small messages can drive big changes." & nbsp;

They developed Unicef's original concept of using real-time SMS messaging for real-time data shuffle and together created features and connected digital channels such as Messenger, Viber, and WhatsApp. Programmers from Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa and Uganda have helped to build us.

They then opened the source code of the messaging service called mTrac to allow others to add and use them for non-commercial purposes.

"This solution has been reproduced, reared and built in Africa, and today has delivered more than 1.5 billion of life news in 53 countries," she said.

This system is used in Uganda where more than 61,000 healthcare professionals use the platform to report real-time critical health data such as outbreaks, availability of critical medicines, and community service reporting problems.

"Every healthcare facility in Uganda uses a platform with an impressive impact: in a country where malaria kills 7% of children under 5 years of age, knowing where anti-malaria drugs always have led to a fivefold increase in availability for children when they need it, from 15% Real-time data acquisition at your fingertips has almost contributed to doubling the coverage of children immunized against lethal diseases. "

Globally, this aphrodisiac solution has had a similar impact on 86 million healthcare workers, children, mothers and their communities, he says.

Cheaper tests

For many communities in Africa, access to diagnostic tests in remote areas is limited due to their cost and because they need to be kept cool and can not be stored for a long time.

"In South Africa you can go to any pharmacy and buy a pregnancy test in the range of $ 2.70 to $ 7.00 But that's not affordable If you're one of the 10.4 million South Africans who live for less than 1.90 dollar a day, it's a lot more than a full-day income. "

Collaboration with Unicef, University of Rhode Island Research group dealing with biotechnology conducts pioneering worldwide research to produce entirely new biological test materials known as aptamery. "They are highly accurate, cheap, portable and resistant to temperature and humidity, and should increase the availability of trials for marginalized communities."

Simply put, it says "it's a game changer."

Thanks to this research and production in the country that reduces production and import costs, "tomorrow's pregnancy test is expected to be half." It will be accessible to more women because it will be affordable and will not be affected by storage conditions in remote areas.

"Innovation must work in a context to work, and if it does, we can reach an impact."

He quotes Nelson Mandela's great inspiration: "Visibility without action is just a dream, visionless events simply go through time, and visions with action can change the world."

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Nurse Pauline Nalutaaya is one of many healthcare workers in Uganda who send weekly health reports using mTrac and minimize costs previously associated with paper reporting.

A few years ago, Unicef ​​met a group of about 40 Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who were looking for creative solutions to some of the most pressing issues facing people in the poorest parts of the world.

But after a week of brain eruptions on the brain, it was clear they were on the wrong path. This week's co-creation has resulted in solutions such as smart app-based subscription applications that would cost people living in poverty a full-day income or water purification solution that should be delivered on a large lorry to remote villages, trails, says Tanya Accone, Senior Innovation Advisor for Unicef, and Deputy Director of the Global Innovation Center in New York

"In other words, these anointed journalists did not come up with the only workable solution because they could not imagine the reality of the world's poorest people," she told me.

"It was a moment when I realized the context was king, and we missed it. Maybe we had the right idea, but not all the right people were in the room and no amount of data could replace the local perspective and expertise."

The South African family Accone has been working in the developing sector for the last eighteen years, mostly for the United Nations, as part of a "collective effort of organizations" such as the UN, the Red Cross, governments and the private sector, trying to make "human rights of all people on the planet, no matter who they are "can be achieved. These include the elimination of poverty, hunger and death that can be prevented; providing access to education, clean water and housing in a healthy environment; and have peace, justice and strong institutions.

There were impressive profits, he says. "Today, 17,000 fewer children die before they die every day in 1990. But more than 5 million children die before their fifth birthday this year."

In sub-Saharan Africa, the percentage of primary school children not in school has dropped by half since mid-2000, he adds, "but we still have the majority of children outside school than anywhere else in the world."

In South Africa, around two-thirds of all children under the age of 18 reach a grant to support children to meet the conditions for poor children and is the largest money transfer system in Africa. "But we are still the most dangerous country in the world. What has been achieved is good, but it's not good enough."

Tanya Accone, Chief Innovation Advisor for Unicef ​​and Deputy Director of the Global Innovation Center in New YorkUnicef

Over the last seven years, Unicef ​​has been working to explore how innovation, technology, and access to beginnings could undermine development to achieve more with less.

The Unicef ​​team has worked in this way in over 85 countries and has found some particularly innovative ideas in South and East Africa.

Health news

In Kigali, Rwanda, Unicef ​​has begun to work with Nyaruka, a software company that "understands that in the context of limited connectivity and widespread misery, SMS or text messaging not only simplifies mobile communications but that these small messages can lead to big changes."

They developed Unicef's original concept of using real-time SMS messaging for real-time data shuffle and together created features and connected digital channels such as Messenger, Viber, and WhatsApp. Programmers from Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa and Uganda have helped to build us.

They then opened the source code for the messaging service called mTrac so that others can add to it and use it for non-commercial purposes.

"This solution was born, raised and built in Africa and today has delivered more than 1.5 billion of life news in 53 countries," she said.

This system is used in Uganda where more than 61,000 healthcare professionals use the platform to report real-time critical health data such as outbreaks, availability of critical medicines, and community service reporting problems.

"Every healthcare facility in Uganda uses a platform with impressive impact, knowing that where malaria is 7% of children under 5 years of age, knowing where malaria is still available has led to a fivefold improvement in their availability for children when they need it, from 15% 79%, thanks to real-time data, nearly doubled the coverage of children immunized against fatal illnesses. "

Globally, this aphrodisiac solution has had a similar impact on 86 million healthcare workers, children, mothers and their communities, he says.

Cheaper tests

For many communities in Africa, access to diagnostic tests in remote areas is limited due to their cost and because they need to be kept cool and can not be stored for a long time.

"In South Africa, you can go to any pharmacy and buy a pregnancy test between $ 2.70 and $ 7.00, but that's not affordable." If you're one of the 10.4 million South Africans who live for less than $ 1.90 a day, that's a lot more than a full day income. "

Collaboration with Unicef, a research group for biotechnology at the University of Rhodes, is conducting pioneering global research that brings entirely new biological test materials, known as aptamers. "They are highly accurate, cheap, portable and resistant to temperature and humidity, and should increase the availability of tests for marginalized communities."

Simply put, she says "It's a game changer".

Thanks to this research and production in a country that reduces production and import costs, tomorrow's pregnancy test is expected to be half. "It will be accessible to more women because it will be affordable and will not be affected by storage conditions in remote areas.

"Innovation must work in a context to work, and if we do, we can get the impact."

He quotes Nelson Mandela's great inspiration: "Visibility without action is just a dream, visionless events simply go through time, and visions with action can change the world."


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